A Mild By Any Other Name is Still A Mild
Home Brewing Recipes
Baker Street Ales Associate Brewer
Arny Lands
Beer Nexus
the crossroads of the beer world
Session beers now seem quite the fad.  Just about every major brewery is
producing one, some great, some just there.  What they sometimes seem to
forget is that the concept of a lower alcohol brew is not new.  It's a just another
version of a traditional mild, guys, and that's been around forever.  Quick story- at
my local brewpub they made an excellent mild and listed it as such on the menu
("Dark Mild").  Well, the younger college crowd stayed away in droves.  However
when the brewer simply changed the name to "Heart of Darkness" sales went
through the roof.  Perception trumps reality once again.  Anyway, here's a simple
extract recipe for my version of a mild but you can call it any catchy name you
like.  In fact, if you come up with a good one send it to me and I'll list it in my next
column.


                                                      Ingredients
.3 lbs. (1.5 kg) liquid malt extract
•1 lb. (0.45 kg) dry malt extract
•4 oz. (112 g) crystal malt (10 ºL)
•2 oz. (56 g) chocolate malt
•2 oz. (56 g) black patent malt
•1/2 oz. (14 g) Fuggles hops (bittering)
•1/2 oz. (14 g) Goldings hops (aroma)
•Wyeast 1098 (British Ale) yeast
•1/2 cup corn sugar for priming (this will give a “British” carbonation level which
is much less than the American preference. If you prefer American style
carbonation levels, use 3/4 to 1full cup)


1.  Steep the specialty grains in 3 gallons (11.4 L) of water in a grain bag for 15
minutes at 110–120 ºF (43–49 ºC).
2.  Remove the grain and bag. Add malt extract while bringing the wort to a boil.
3.  Stir in the malt extract to make sure it dissolves. Bring to a boil and add the
bittering hops. Boil for 1 hour.
4.  Add the aroma hops at the end of the boil. Let wort cool and add to fermenter.
5.  Add enough cold water to bring the level to 5 gallons (19 L).
6.  Add yeast and stir to aerate. Ferment at 55–65 ºF (13–18 ºC) for 7–10 days.
7.  Rack to bottling bucket and prime with corn sugar.
8.  Bottle and let condition at 50–65 ºF (10–18 ºC) for one to three weeks.


                                              
 Extract and Grain Version
For those of you who are thining about doing an all grain brew here's my recipe
for a mild that gets you to take the first step on the path - it combines both
extract and grain.

                                                          
 Ingredients
•3.3 lbs. (1.5 kg) liquid malt extract
•1 lb. (0.45 kg) dry malt extract
•4 oz. (112 g) crystal malt (10 ºL)
•2 oz. (56 g) chocolate malt
•2 oz. (56 g) black patent malt
•1/2 oz. (14 g) Fuggles hops (bittering)
•1/2 oz. (14 g) Goldings hops (aroma)
•Wyeast 1098 (British Ale) yeast
•1/2 cup corn sugar for priming (this will give a “British” carbonation level which
is much less than the American preference. If you prefer American style
carbonation levels, use 3/4 to 1full cup)

1.  Steep the specialty grains in 3 gallons (11.4 L) of water in a grain bag for 15
minutes at 110–120 ºF (43–49 ºC). Remove the grain and bag.
2. Add malt extract while bringing the wort to a boil. Stir in the malt extract to
make sure it dissolves. Bring to a boil and add the bittering hops. Boil for 1 hour.
3.  Add the aroma hops at the end of the boil. Let wort cool and add to fermenter.
4.  Add enough cold water to bring the level to 5 gallons (19 L). Add yeast and stir
to aerate. Ferment at 55–65 ºF (13–18 ºC) for 7–10 days.
5.  Rack to bottling bucket and prime with corn sugar.
6.  Bottle and let condition at 50–65 ºF (10–18 ºC) for one to three weeks.




                                              ------------------------------

                                            
ARNY ANSWERS.....

Now to answer a few of the many questions I've received.  By the way,  keep      
sending them in.  It's all about making good beer and that's the fun of it!


Q-  Can I speed up fermentation?
A - Yes you can. Fermentation speed is dependent upon a few key factors, such
as the amount of yeast originally added to the home brew, the sugar content of
the home brew liquid, the type of juice used, but mostly, the temperature at which
you are home brewing.  Juice that is fermenting in a cold basement may take 10
times longer than a bottle brewing in a 25º C environment. I usually speed up my
batches by placing them somewhere warm. Always remember to keep your
home brew out of direct sunlight which encourages bacteria growth.


Q-  How long should I wait to chill (cold break) my beer?
A - It is very important to chill your beer as quickly and sanitary as possible.  The
cold break is your second chance bind those remaining proteins together before
making it to the fermentation vessel.  If your wort starts looking like an egg drop
soup, the cold break is a win.  It is nearly impossible to chill the beer quickly
without a wort chiller.   While you are running your wort chiller, stir to create a
whirlpool powerful enough to see the bottom of your kettle.


             That's it for this column.  Hope to see you next month!

        Good Brewing and Cheers!

            Arny Lands
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