Beer News EXTRA !
Buddy Holly pub
wins beer award
Better Beer Bread
News Archive
Here it is - a quick and easy way to
make great beer bread according
to noted beer chef
Joe Attamante:

Makes 2 loaves, 8 to 10 serving:
1 cup  Stout Beer
1 cup water (at 110 degrees)
1/2 cup molasses
2 1/2 cups rye flour
2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour, plus a
half-cup more at the end
2 packages yeast
2 teaspoons salt
• Combine beer, water and
molasses in bowl of standing
mixer.
• Add both flours and mix on low
speed for 3 minutes
• Add yeast and salt and turn mixer
to medium speed for 10 minutes.
• Add additional all-purpose flour
until dough "balls up" off sides of
bowl.
• Turn dough out onto a floured
surface and knead by hand for a
few minutes.
• Separate dough in half and form
into loaves. Put dough into well-
oiled 9-inch loaf pans and bake in
425-degree oven for 15 minutes.
• Turn heat to 250 degrees and
bake for 45 minutes more. Cool.
note - while you're waiting for it to
cool it is strongly recommended that
you have a beer, or two, or even three.   
A pub owner, who pays tribute to Buddy Holly with the
beers that he brews, has won an award for his ales.  
His pub, the Wern Fawr Inn, in south-west Wales, was
voted regional pub of the year by the real ale lobby
group, Camra.

Will Hopton, who is brewer as well as owner of the
pub, has named the dozen real ales he serves  after
his childhood hero, pop star Buddy Holly.  Hopton and
his family have run for three decades and has been a
fan of the 1950's rock and roll singer since the pub
first opened.

"We only play Buddy Holly music on the juke box and
it seemed logical to name each of my beers after one
of his great songs.  We also have several ales named
after members of Buddy's group, The Crickets."  

While the names of the beers may be caught in a time
warp the ales certainly are not.  According to a
Camra  press release the "quality of the ales is
outstanding!"

"Since we won the award we can hardly keep up with
the demand" said  Hopton.  "We only serve real ales
and are proud to do so.  Thanks to Camra for chosing
us!:

There are over 500 brewpubs across Britain which
serve real ale.  Thanks to their efforts and various
Camra campaigns real ale ales sales at a 30-year
high.
QUICK HITS
Big Ad reaches Big Audience- Carlton Draught's Big Ad tapped into
modern technology to live up to its "big" claim, with millions of copies of the ad
being downloaded in August as links appeared on thousands of Internet blogs. The
ad features computer-generated armies of men wearing robes running toward each
other while chanting the ad's message. A shot from the air shows a man lift a pint of
beer, with scores of yellow-robed men racing into his mouth and on into his
stomach.  Give it a look at:
http://www.bigad.com.au/


What Beer Really Looks Like - Welcome to the Molecular Expressions
BeerShots website featuring photomicrographs and digital images (photographs
taken through an optical microscope) of the World's most famous beers.  Then
again this might be more than you really want to see.  
http://micro.magnet.fsu.edu/beershots/index.html



Beer City, PA - The Phoenixville, PA area might just consider changing it's
name to Beerville when the new Iron Hill brewpub opens early next year.  Iron Hill
will join brewpubs Sly Fox, Sly Fox 2, Destiny, and Victory Brewing all located within  
a 12 mile radius.  This is the highest concentration of brewpubs per mile in the
Northeast.
Magic Beer Mat

A beer mat that knows when a glass is nearly empty and automatically
asks for a refill has been created by thirsty researchers in Germany.

Andreas Butz at the University of Munich and Michael Schmitz from
Saarland University came up with the idea while out drinking with their
students. The disc-shaped mat can be attached to a normal beer mat
so that it still soaks up spilt liquid and displays an advertisement.
But it also contains a pressure sensor and radio transmitter to
alert bar staff of the need for a refill.

The device weighs 110 grams and costs $100 to make, but Butz and
Schmitz think the weight and cost would shrink if the mat were
to be mass-produced.









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They say the mat could also be used for
interactive TV events, as it contains an
accelerometer capable of sensing when it is
being waved in the air.

(story sent in by beernexus reader Pete Tamubrro)