Crime in Cleveland

Drivers who smell of alcohol—
whether they are legally drunk or
not—can now be fined in Cleveland.

“Under our city ordinance, at this
point you can still be cited for a
physical control violation,” said Mark
Fyock, of the Police Department.
And there's even more.  Police across
the state can now issue tickets to
drivers, even if they don’t register ..
08 percent.
Many drivers are rightfully enraged.
As driver Tim Finn said, “Having one
beer an hour earlier won't make you
drunk but it might make you smell.  
Getting a ticket for that is simply
wrong.”


Lose Weight with Hops

Bitter-tasting beer curbs the
development of fat inside the body,
researchers at Japan’s top brewery
have found.
A team of scientists led by Keiji
Kondo, a vice president of Kirin
Brewery Company's research
department,  reached that
conclusion after feeding a group of
mice high-fat food containing
isohumulones, an important
component of
hops (a factor in
creating beer bitterness), and
another group the same food
without isohumulones.
After six weeks the group that was
given the isohumulones-free feed
grew 22 percent fatter than the
other group.

So forget the Atkins Diet and have an
IPA!
Feature News  from Draught Board 15  & beernexus.com
Czech Drinkers
Lead the World

Beverage industry analyst Datamonitor reports that at
the U.S. is the world's most valuable beer market, with
sales of about $73.7 billion, but in terms of per capita
consumption of beer, Czech drinkers continue to out
drink all others.  They  down an average of 326 U.K.
pints a year. Irish drinkers came in second with 300
pints, followed by Germany, Austria and Belgium.

In terms of value per capita, the Irish spent $1,282.00,
the Norwegians $657.00 and the British $537.00 each
on beer. Norway had the most expensive beer prices in
the world, with the average pint costing $5.54. Malaysia
came in second in the cost of a pint, $5.18, followed by
Japan at $4.47. The Irish top the list as stout drinkers,
quaffing 134 pints per head of population, followed by
the British with seven pints per person.


Bud  Battle Continues

Czech brewery Budejovicky Budvar has just won the
legal right to continue to use the trademark "Bud" in
the U.K., according to a ruling by the House of Lords,
the U.K.'s highest court. U.S. brewer, Anheuser-Busch,
has fought for years to deny Budejovicky Budvar the
ability to market its beer as Bud in countries around
the globe. The U.K. is the only country in which both
companies can simultaneously use the "Bud' and
"Budweiser" name.

Elsewhere in the world, Budejovicky Budvar has lost
court cases to A-B in Switzerland, Hungary, Italy,
Australia, Argentina, Denmark, Finland, Italy, New
Zealand and Spain, but won in several other countries,
such as Australia, Japan, South Korea, Greece,
Portugal, Denmark, Finland and most recently, Sweden.

Budejovicky Budvar is the only brewer to make its beer
in the town of Ceske Budejovice (known as Budweis in
German). In the U.S., the beer is sold as Czechvar.
Overall, Budvar is sold in over 60 countries on five
continents. A-B sells Budweiser, the world's largest
selling beer brand, in more than 80 countries. A-B
began using the Budweiser name in 1876, nineteen
years before the formation of Budejovicky Budvar, but
the Czechs claim that the name was commonly used to
refer to beer brewed in the area of Ceske Budejovice
for hundreds of years.