Attack of the BeerBots

One of the latest innovations of the tech age:
automated countertop brewing systems, sometimes
referred to as beerbots. Like the homebrewer's
version of the bread machine, beerbots have
turned the ancient craft of brewing into a neat and
tidy hobby that requires minimal skill, which ofr the
most advanced models means pushing a button.
The level of automation varies among the different
brands. For example, with the models from
PicoBrew the human participant must transfer the
beer from the fermenting vessel to the serving keg.
The
Brewie Beerbot also requires similar liquid
transferring. Other setups, like the forthcoming
beerbots from
iGulu and MiniBrew, do virtually
everything automatically . The brewing system from
WilliamsWarn likewise demands little attention  
since every stage of the process occurs in one
container, which is eventually tapped like a keg.You
push a button, walk away for a week or two, and
come back and pour yourself a beer.

One word of caution - don't expect to learn very
much about brewing if you get a beerbot.

Beer Shelf Life

Beer, just like most other food and drink products has a shelf life, as well as proper and
improper way to store it. Where and how you choose to store your beer can make a huge
difference in what it tastes like when you finally do crack that bottle or can open.

The quick answer to this question is you should either store your beer in the fridge, or in a cool,
dark place like a closet or corner of your basement. The three enemies of beer are oxygen, heat,
and light. In general, you want to keep your beer away from all three of these whenever possible.

There’s a misconception out there that all beer needs to be kept in the fridge. While yes,
if you want to drink it then you probably want it cold, you don’t have to keep it in the fridge
if that drinking isn’t happening today.

You can keep a beer a room temperature for a week or two (and maybe longer) without it doing
any real damage. While that can probably extend to a month, once your beer starts sitting around
much longer than 4 weeks the flavor is going to start to change in ways you’re not going to like.

There’s a misconception out there that all beer needs to be kept in the fridge. While yes, if
you want to drink it then you probably want it cold, you don’t have to keep it in the fridge if
that drinking isn’t happening today.

One big question is can you move your beer from room temperature to the fridge and then back to
room temperature and then back to the fridge.  For example you need space in the fridge to store
food for a special dinner so you take beer out.  After the event you put it back in.  The answer is
don't worry.  You can do that several times without major bad things happening to the beer.

How can you tell if your beer has exceeded it's shelf life? Look for these flavors: a waxy floor or
mouthfeel,  cardboard or paper, and dulled hop flavor (for hoppy beers).

In general fresh is always best so check the date on the bottle or can.
Feature News  
from  beernexus.com
Edited by Jim Attacap
BEERNEXUS
the crossroads of the beer world
Beer in the Cockpit

A passenger aboard a recent Jet2 flight from
Spain to England saw something no traveler ever
wants to see on a plane: a beer in the cockpit.
Steve Lewis, of Northamptonshire, England, says
he was “shocked” upon landing at Birmingham
airport and seeing a can of beer sitting between
the pilots.Lewis, snapped a photo of the beer as
proof of his charge. He complained to the airline
about it too, but was initially told his photo was
not taken aboard his flight and might be fake.

Upon further investigation of aviation authorities  
the photograph was deemed legitimate and
confirmed that an unopened can was net to the
pilot seat. Jet2's investigations concluded that it  
had been handed to a member of the cabin crew
by a customer when they were leaving the
aircraft, and simply put down in the cockpit by a
member of cabin crew, so that she could
continue helping customers as they
disembarked. Lewis, meanwhile, isn’t entirely
satisfied with Jet2’s explanation nor with the kind
of beer he saw - a  no flavor, light American lager.
-