Is It Clean or Beer Clean?
                   
      by D. L. Malinak


Hello Bob - thought I'd send you an article about something I'm most
passionate about which would also be of help to your readers.  I'm
talking about how to tell if your beer glass is clean; not regular clean
but beer clean.  Every glass I use at home is 100% beer clean,
unfortunately the same can't be said for many glasses used in bars
and restaurants.   

Things like detergent residue and oils are pretty common on
glassware but they can alter the aroma and flavor of your beer —
and their presence means that glass isn’t really clean. The good
news is there’s a really easy way to tell if that glass you’re drinking
out of isn’t “beer clean.”

Don't get me wrong.  I'm not saying a lot of glasses out there are
dirty.  I'm only saying that they are not perfect for beer.  I'm a beer
nerd so that bothers me.  If you're not don't worry.  A glass that isn't
beer clean is perfectly all right to use; you won't get sick.  But for a
full taste experience (after all that's what you're paying for) then you
should use these tips to see how clean your glass really is.

One last thing. If you like to frequent bars or drink a beer or two at
your average restaurant you might not what to read any further.
Once you know how to detect a dirty glass you'll notice it every time.  
So, if you're ready and brave - here goes:

1.  You can tell a beer glass isn’t “beer clean” when someone pours
a beer for you in a glass and bubbles cling to the side.  Think back
and I bet that's been the case the last few times you've had a beer
out or even in your own home.

2.The head on your beer will also dissipate rapidly in a glass that
isn’t beer clean, and/or the foam won’t cling to the side of the glass
as you start to drink:  This is an easy sign to recognize and you'll
find it happening many more times than you ever realized.

3. You can tell if your beer glasses at home are clean by just dipping
them in water. If the water coats the inside evenly, then you’re good.
If you end up with droplets on the inside of your glass, the glass
could use another clean.  Go check a few of your glasses out right
now and see how you score on the beer clean test.

Yes, it's that direct and simple to determine beer glass cleanness.

But now that you know how to evaluate the glass what do you do
when your fully poored beer fails the test? Since I learned all this a
few years ago, I think I’ve sent one beer back.  I probably should
have done it more often but I lean over backwards giving the place
the benefit of the doubt that it was a one time error. .

Also, it may sound wimpy, but I wouldn’t recommend pointing it out
anywhere you happen to be drinking unless your beer truly is awful.
However, if you notice it happening more than once at a spot, you
might want to find somewhere else to drink.  

Beer clean glasses should be the standard in every bar.  Maybe the
only way to insure that is to send every dirty on back.  Then again
perhaps a quiet word with management would be even more
effective.

I raise my (really clean) glass in a toast to you Bob.  Love the
column and hope you consider printing mine.

----------
Many thanks D.L. for pointing out something every serious beer drinker
should know.  I'm very wary of bars that don't understand every  glass
should be rinsed carefully before serving.  I enjoyed your article;
well
done! Please write again.

I'd like to  invite everyone to send me their own columns about
anything related to beer in any way just as D
.L. did.   I select
the best and publish them here.  So join in and get writing!

Cheers!
Bob
BeerNexus proudly presents

Bob Montemurro
"the ombudsman of beer"

Bob and Friends Speak of Beer......


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